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What is A Tooth Friendly Diet?

Not only does what you eat effect your gums and teeth by building healthier foundations, but what you eat also helps prevent in tooth decay, cavities and gum disease as well. If you ever wondered about what you should be eating and shouldn’t be eating or what foods are really healthy for your teeth, you’re in luck because there is a whole list below of stuff you should stay away from and stuff you should start to or continue to eat. Of course when you think about the teeth, you probably think of thins automatically like fruits, vegetables and whole grains. But, there are also some really great foods you may not be aware of.

Is Soda Bad for Teeth?

The burning question of the day. IS soda really bad for you? In a one worded answer: YES! But, it’s a little more complex than that, isn’t it? Soft drinks do cause cavities. But, even more so, they also cause bad breath, gum disease, tooth decay and really they just aren’t good for your health at all – mouth health and otherwise. Even if you drink a soda during the day and brush your teeth at night, floss, use mouthwash, problems can still occur. The biggest reason soda is bad for your teeth is because it’s a sticky and very sugary liquid that can stick to your teeth. Not only your teeth, but the grooves in your teeth, cracks, and spaces – areas where you might not even able to get into with your toothbrush and floss. Also, the bacteria in your mouth can eat the sugar which causes acid – acid eats enamel and once your enamel is gone it leaves your teeth vulnerable to getting cavities. It’s a really vicious circle. Even if you drink drinks that don’t have any sugar in them, they can contain acid or citric acid. These will still eat away at your enamel and teeth. Here are some stats on acid versus sugar in a few different drinks. In this case HIGH ACID is good and LOW acid is bad:

How to Treat a Cavity?

Cavities are small openings or holes in your teeth; they also may be referred to as tooth decay or caries. They oftentimes build up after plaque and bacteria enter the mouth and “lay” on the teeth, but they also can happen if you don’t brush your teeth, eat too many sweet things and don’t brush and floss between the teeth and in some dentists opinion, they are also caused by a lack of minerals in your diet. In some situations, a cavity can be stopped or slowed down, but in other situations dire measures must be taken. If you have a cavity and you are wondering about the options available to you, please continue to read below.

What is A Cavity?

If you have ever had a cavity, you probably already know that a cavity is essentially a hole in your tooth. But, what you may not be aware of is that a cavity or tooth decay is something that happens over time – have it be weeks, months or years, a cavity doesn’t just soda up overnight, it’s something that is ongoing and eventually turns into a cavity. Most people think that when you get a cavity, it’s the end of the road, but did you know that you can actually interrupt, slow, reverse or completely stop the decaying process? It’s true. Anyone can do this, no matter your age.