Common medical questions and answers through blogs and articles

Tag: oral health

Best Diet to Prevent Bad Breath

It’s hard to resist raw chopped onions on a Coney dog or a big burger with a thin slice of raw onion, but you’d better hope you don’t have to socialize too much after downing these tasty treats.

Battling Bad Breath

As a general rule, bad breath is related to what we drink or eat.  As to beverages, alcohol is sure to give you bad breath, coffee does as well.  Different cultures have spicy foods, and people who consume these foods on a regular basis, will experience odors, not only emanating from their mouth, but also from their pores.

Listerine, a leading mouthwash manufacturer, says there are five top foods that will give you bad breath – of course, we are familiar with onions and garlic being the biggest culprits, and even canned tuna is no surprise, but horseradish and dairy foods also make your mouth feel a little funky.

Dairy products as a source for bad breath may surprise you, but, while dairy products may be good for your teeth and bones, they make your mouth feel unclean.  This is because naturally occurring bacteria from your tongue feeds on the amino acids in dairy products (milk, cottage cheese, yogurt and cheeses), resulting in a foul odor.

What Teeth say about Overall Health

Next time you visit your dentist you may tell him more about yourself than you realize. Your dentist might learn a lot about your overall health simply by performing a routine dental exam. A client who has teeth that the enamel has worn down on might be stressed out and grinding their teeth during the night. Your teeth, gums and the tissues found in the mouth can share a lot about the state of your overall health. Sometimes the dentist might be the first health care professional who warns you of health conditions. Here are a few things your mouth might be saying about you.

Diseases that Cause Cavities

A smile says a lot about someone. It’s a natural gesture to want to smile back, but what if your pearly whites are less than attractive? Products that whiten teeth have bombarded the market with effort to improve the everyday appearance of someone’s smile. What if our teeth are trying to tell us something is wrong? Okay, most people try to fix their appearances rather than read into warning signs that our bodies are giving us. What concerns should be addressed when looking at a smile that makes you question how many cups of coffee or sweets a person consumes? Well, you’ve come to the right place, these are common medical questions most people will ask the Internet for the answer before stepping foot into a doctor’s office.

Sleep Apnea and Teeth

Millions of people in the United States today suffer from sleep apnea, and many of them don’t even know it. In fact, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, upwards of 12 million people in the U.S. have from sleep apnea. That means that about 1 in 20 people throughout the country suffer from sleep apnea, with many of them not even being aware of their medical condition. The problem, of course, with not knowing is the serious complications that can occur due to this disorder with no preventive measures being taken. Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder that can cause its sufferers to stop breathing while they’re sleeping, with incidents of breathing cessation occurring up to 100 times per night. One of the little known consequences of sleep apnea is its effects on oral health, which can be serious.

Routine Dental Care for Seniors

The average lifespan is increasing, and that means seniors have more time now than ever before to enjoy a full and active life. It’s true that seniors in Livingston and throughout the country have a greater expectation of having a long, happy life. But if your teeth are in poor condition, chances are you might not be enjoying life as much as you should. If you’re going to live longer than your parents and grandparents, why not make it the best life possible?! Perhaps there was a time when living longer meant you were a likely candidate for losing your teeth and wearing dentures, but those days are in the past. And, even if you do have dentures, you want them to last. Whether you’re a denture wearer, you have your own natural teeth, or you have dental implants or any of the other wonderful innovations of restorative dentistry, your oral hygiene habits are a vital part of your healthy, active life.

Routine Dental Care

Walt Disney once said, “A kick in the teeth may be the best thing in the world for you.” Needless to say, this was a metaphor. No one wants to experience an actual kick in the teeth … not just because it’s painful, but also because, well, everyone likes having nice teeth! Right about now you may be thinking, “Well, duh!” However, have you ever thought about how likely it is that someday you may lose teeth due to improper dental care? A healthy dental care routine often is all that’s necessary to ensure that your teeth remain with you for the rest of your life. But keeping your teeth may be only half the story. Recent studies have shown a potential link between poor oral hygiene and risk factors for developing certain medical conditions such as heart disease and diabetes. The fact is that poor dental hygiene is the main reason that people throughout the country can experience tooth decay, tooth loss, and even loss of the bone structures surrounding the teeth. Here are some tips on optimal dental care routines for everyone in your family.

Types of Oral Cancer

Some types of cancer are on the decline throughout the entire United States. However, the number of cases involving other types of cancers is increasing. Oral cancer is one of these, and more Americans are in the high-risk groups for developing this disease than ever. There are several types of cancers that are considered oral, and the type typically depends upon the location of the disease. As with many types of cancer, the exact causes of the different forms of oral cancer are unknown to modern medicine. However, medical researchers have identified risk factors and behaviors that can put some individuals in greater danger of developing oral cancer, especially if they exhibit more than one of these components. Following is information on the different types of oral cancer, risk factors, and how to cope with a cancer diagnosis.